Member Highlight

CultureMap Dallas: Stay in the Know

Say a little about your company and what you do for them:

CultureMap is an all digital media platform curated by experts who are passionate about reporting and celebrating the city they live in, giving you the very best local entertainment, information and services when and where you want it.

We were launched in Houston five years ago, followed by a launch in Austin in 2011 and then CultureMap made its way to the big D in 2012. Dallas is comprised of nine full-time staff members from Editorial, Sales to Marketing. Our Editorial team also consists of numerous freelance contributors.

Who are your customers and what makes them choose your company?

Our customers are our advertisers as well as our readers. Our passionate readers help drive the traffic to CultureMap’s website, mobile and social media sites, which in turn helps us sell to our advertisers. 62% of our readers range from ages 25 to 39, with a 60% female and 40% male ratio.

CultureMap advertisers range from a national level, such as Cadillac, to a local level like The Dallas Arboretum. These advertisers want access to our young professional audience. We allow them face to face access to this audience through events we host during the year. Our current events include quarterly CultureMap Socials, Tastemakers food event and Holiday Pop Up Shop.

How and when did you get started doing this kind of work?

I started working in media back in 2010 when I took a Marketing Coordinator position with the Dallas Observer straight out of college. I quickly fell in love with the fast-paced, competitive world of Dallas media. Being a millennial, I began to notice a shift in how my generation read and shared their news. We were all going social. The opportunity opened in early 2013 for me to dive into the digital world at CultureMap Dallas as a Marketing Manager. I’ve been happily glued to my MacBook ever since.

What are the two most valuable things you have learned since starting in your field?

1) It’s a labor of love. The job description for marketing is all-encompassing. At any point, you could be handling six different jobs in one. You can never get too comfortable and that’s the exciting part.

2) The rules are always changing. Facebook alone keeps us on our toes with the numerous policy changes it implements each month. It’s up to you as a marketer to recognize how you need to change and adapt to keep up with your audience.

What is the most satisfying part of your work?

Other than the brilliant individuals I get to work with? I’ve always said one of the treasures of working in Marketing is that you get to see a final product. Whether it’s a social media campaign, an intricate promotion or an event, you always to get a front row seat to how it all plays out. There’s nothing more rewarding than taking a step back to soak in the sold out event you had been tirelessly working to execute.

What are your biggest challenges?

It’s a competitive media world here in Dallas. Being the new kid on the block isn’t always easy. Patience and persistence become your pillars.

How much time do you spend at The Common Desk in an average week?

30 - 40 hours a week. We like to mix it up and work remotely on Fridays.

How much free time do you have? How do you spend it?

With an 11-month-old, free time has become a thing of the past. When I am sneaking away for some time, it’s usually with my better half. We spend it checking out a new restaurant, cocktails and a show at The Kessler or sitting in blissful silence at a movie.

Are you working on a Mac or a PC?

My MacBook Pro is listed in my will.

What are two mobile apps you could not work without?

1) Instagram. For obvious reasons of course. I also frequently use it for lead sourcing. It’s pure genius.

2) Eventbrite Neon. We use Eventbrite for our ticket selling platform. The app allows us to check people in and sell tickets at the door seamlessly.

What’s your favorite place to eat in Deep Ellum?

Uber.

If I have time to kill, Cane Rosso

written by Common Desk

Common Desk opened in the fall of 2012 with a vision to redefine the way Dallas perceived a workspace. By creating a stimulating environment for both Dallas’ suit and tie professionals and artistic freelancers, the Common Desk community gained strength through the diversity of its shared office spaces. Today, hundreds of companies call Common Desk home.

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